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135 Tips for Writing Successful Business Documents
by Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts

135 Tips for Writing Successful Business Documents
135 Tips for Writing Successful Business Documents
Write it so they'll read it

Does your writing shout Read me?
Does it inspire the action you want or expect?
Does it contribute to your company's profitability?

If you answered no to any of these questions, this book will make the difference. With freshness and wit, Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts explains how to compose business and technical documents that people will read and act on. Whether you work for a large corporation or a grass-roots enterprise, this handy guide will show you to write with confidence and competence.
Including

• A Six Step Process that gets you the results you want

• Examples of real documents, from brochures to press releases to resumes

• "War stories" from the author's own experience as the head of a successful business-writing firm


"Sheryl Lindsell-Roberts once again turns her command of the craft of writing — and her terrific sense of humor — to the job of helping us write better. Her 135 tips help bring clarity to a world of muddled business documents." — Bill Lane, Managing Editor, Boston Business Journal



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10. Know the best time to deliver the message.

Timing is everything. When is it too early? When is it too late? For example, if it's noon and you need to let people know about a 1:00 meeting, an e-mail message may not do. Phone the people and/or leave notes on their computer screens.

A Word from Sheryl

A participant in one of my workshops worked for a major university. In mid-May she sent out a letter to incoming freshmen informing them of check-in procedures, parking policies, and more for the fall term. In August she was barraged with phone calls inquiring about these issues, and she didn't know why.
It's because the timing of her letter was way off. Students who haven't yet graduated from high school and have a whole summer ahead of them aren't thinking about check-in procedures and parking policies. If she mails the letters closer to the time students need the information, they will pay attention. Timing is everything!