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100 Words Almost Everyone Confuses and Misuses
by the Editors of the American Heritage® Dictionaries

100 Words Almost Everyone Confuses and Misuses


Did the CEO flaunt the law or flout it?

When is it its, and when is it it's?

Is there a problem with saying NOO-kyuh-ler?

Is it OK to be impacted by something?

The editors of The American Heritage® College Dictionary have selected one hundred of the most commonly confused and misused words in the English language as the basis for the third title in the popular series, The 100 WordsTM. This common sense guide to some of the most troublesome bugbears, pet peeves, and faux pas of written and spoken English features advice from the renowned American Heritage® usage program.

The information you need to tell right from wrong — or true errors from matters of taste — is explained in clear language with plenty of useful examples. Whether you're looking for authoritative guidance on proper usage or ammunition to counter a misguided critic, 100 Words Almost Everyone Confuses and Misuses is a handy resource for anyone who cares about our language

Also Available in The 100 WordsTM series:

100 Words Every High School Graduate Should Know

100 Words Every High School Freshman Should Know



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Sample Entry:

cap·i·tol (kp'-tl)
noun

1. A building or complex of buildings in which a state legislature meets.
2. Capitol The building in Washington DC where the Congress of the United States meets.

[Middle English Capitol, Jupiter's temple in Rome, from Old French capitole, from Latin Capitlium, after Capitlnus, Capitoline, the hill on which Jupiter's temple stood; perhaps akin to caput; see etymology at capital1.]

See Note at capital.